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cadet blogs

Halloween at the Coast Guard Academy

(Just for Fun, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Driscoll Photo Hello, readers. It’s been awhile since I’ve written, but this has been my busiest semester yet. While I love some things about Regimental Staff more than others, Halloween 2014 was one of the highlights.

 

My friends and I spent almost two weeks debating amongst the nine of us what costumes we would wear. We finally decided on the Avengers, and all got costumes to dress up for the Corps’ Halloween dinner and the annual trek up the hill to the senior leadership team’s houses. There were many good costumes, awesome photos, and fun times at the corps’ dinner and on the hill. The best part for me was that Captain McCauley, the Commandant of Cadets, got wind of our plans to dress as the Avengers, and dressed up as Nick Fury, the Avengers’ leader. It was quite the surprise—we didn’t expect him to do that at all!

 

Captain “Fury” was one of the many surprises from this semester, and I hope that there are more in the coming months. While I’m counting down to graduation, don’t hesitate to email me with questions at Peter.M.Driscoll@uscga.edu. Until next time…

 

More about Peter.

 

A Month of Fun

(Academics, Athletics, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Cantrell Photo A ton of great events happened this month! It started off with my cousin's wedding, which I was able to go home for. She was a beautiful bride and it was great to see my family. (The sunshine and warm ocean water helped out, too). Parents Weekend occurred this month as well. Although my parents did not come up, I had a great time hanging out with my friends and their parents and I was so grateful and appreciative to be “adopted” by some wonderful parents!

 

I completed my community service hours this month as well by volunteering for the breast cancer 5K walk in Rocky Neck State Park. It was a beautiful fall day and it was great to see so many walkers come out dressed in pink to support a great cause. I helped out with registering individuals who had not done so online. I also marked some of the route with signs to promote awareness.

 

This month was a huge month for my major (Management) because they had three deans from other colleges and universities come to our school for the management major accreditation. The first-class cadets had lunch with the deans and explained what our daily lives are like at the Academy and the classes we enjoy within the major.

 

I just got back from my first meet of the season. I think the team did really well and it was a great start to the season. I dove okay, but more importantly, I calmed my nerves so that is helpful moving on to the next meet.

 

Any questions don’t hesitate to ask! Sara.E.Cantrell@uscga.edu.

 

More about Sara.

 

Medallions, Colors, and Perfect Water

(Athletics, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Kukich Photo While the Regimental Review for Homecoming Weekend and the football game the following Saturday afternoon have always been mandatory for cadets, this was the first Homecoming at the Academy that meant anything to me. It seemed like everyone was excited to see their older brother or parent that weekend; the alumni parked literally everywhere on campus Friday morning, including outside of our windows in the quad. Classes and trainings continued as scheduled, with one modification for the Medallion Ceremony to be held in the late afternoon.

 

Every year the class celebrating their 50th reunion from the Academy is invited to return, specially for participation in the Medallion Ceremony. The Commandant of the Coast Guard is aided by three cadets, from Delta Company (the best company), in honoring each alumni with a medallion around their neck as their name and highest rank attained is read off by a senior cadet in the gymnasium. Surrounding the alumni, who sit on the court, in the bleachers as a Corps of Cadets is a powerful atmosphere in itself, but not the most personal. For me to feel connected to the events of Homecoming I needed more.

 

This year after assisting the Color Guard present the colors at the Regimental Review and Medallion Ceremony, I headed down to the boathouse for crew practice. Being a Friday and pretty late already around 5 p.m., I decided to go out on the water as soon as possible. Without waiting for my teammates I paddled down to Jacob’s Rock, about 300 meters, in my single rowing shell. Not far from shore I could hear alumni joining the women’s soccer team on the field, saw the lights illuminating the football field, and again, found cars scattered in every possible place around campus. Yet, there I was alone on the water with what felt like no connection to any of those cars or people.

 

Listening to evening colors as the sun set at both the Coast Guard Academy and Naval Sub Base New London on the water rowing back to the dock is always breathtaking. The sounds echo from both sides of the river and on a clear night, the complete silence when the music stops seems to linger just long enough. On this night, however, the puttering burp of an engine filled that silence, along with the brushing of oars other than my own against the dock. Catching the gaze of the five men sitting in a boat across the dock was just what I needed for Homecoming to mean something. The tired looks of men who wrestled with calculus, stood years of midwatch, and had time to start families stared at me, who at twenty was exhausted from a paddle. One of them asked if it was a good row. “Yes, the water was perfect” was my response.

 

At the end of this year’s Homecoming Weekend I chose to reflect on the exchange with an alumni crew who still mustered the energy for a row. There were many reminders that there are thousands who have graduated before us, who wear medallions, and observe colors. Being tired is not a valid excuse not to care. It is a reason to keep searching and eventually, somehow find the perfect water.

 

More about Sarah.

 

It Has Been a Long Time…

(Athletics, Extracurricular Activities and Faith-Based Involvement, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Belanger Photo So it has been a very, very long time since I have written something and a lot of things have changed. First of all, getting the privileges of a second class has probably been the biggest reward yet. I can finally wear civilian clothes and blend in with the citizens of New London. I also started playing rugby for the Academy. The guys on the team are awesome, and it may be considered a very rough sport, but being on the pitch makes all of the Academy stress disappear. We have had a decent season and I am looking forward for the spring season as well. Becoming a second class also means that you fully integrate into your major. Besides one non-major specific class next semester, all of my classes either pertain to the Government major or life in the fleet. I have never been so happy being done with mathematics! My writing has improved and I love writing about the current events in the world. Remember if anyone has any questions let me know, and if you receive the bulletin check out my articles in the December issue!

 

Got a question? Email me Nathan.D.Belanger@uscga.edu!

 

More about Nathan.

 

Good-Bye to a Beautiful Woman

(Extracurricular Activities and Faith-Based Involvement, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Culp Photo I might have mentioned before that, whenever I’m asked what the best part about the Academy is, my response is automatically the people here. What I want to impress upon all my blog readers, however, is that by “people,” I don’t just mean cadets or active duty Coast Guardsmen. I’ve certainly been touched by and learned much from those people, but there are also people who don’t work inside the Academy or live in the barracks who have changed my life. As we speak, one of the Officer’s Christian Fellowship field leaders, Betsy Teuton, lays in Yale Hospital waiting for the Lord to call her to His Kingdom.

 

Never have I met such a wonderful woman, such a good-hearted person. She always had love to spare, for her cadets and for anybody who walked in and out of her life. Betsy has been fighting cancer for the past few years, with a strength and faith I’ve never seen in anyone else. She’s an inspiration, that’s for sure. If she can face that battle with the courage she has, I know any cadet can get through the challenges of Coast Guard life. Her selflessness is amazing; her spirit and positivity are contagious; and her peace, her faith even as we all say good-bye soars above all fear and sadness.

 

You can only begin to realize how many lives she changed when cadets are arriving in 15-passenger vans and booking train tickets back to New London just to say their farewells. She was like a mother to them, just like she was and still is to me. We remember Betsy as she crosses the bar, and I personally give God thanks and praise for her presence in my life and in the life of the Coast Guard Academy. Good-bye to a beautiful, God-filled woman – she will be missed, but celebrated in our lives from here on out.

 

More about Abby.

 

Hello :)

(Academics, Athletics, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Daghir Photo I am just taking a break from writing a paper for Fisheries Biology class and decided that there was no better time to take a moment to let you into my semester. WE HAVE REACHED MIDTERM. It is honestly crazy and very hard for me to grasp this and on top of that, I have just this past weekend finished fall ball for lacrosse with a play day in Massachusetts. Most of my classes are going well, and I have to say I am enjoying myself thoroughly in each of my endeavors as a cadet this year. I have found a good spot in Delta company, and as a member of the regimental planning division, I write the scripts for drill and have also, with my roommate, somehow advanced to seating the VIP guests for regimental drill.

 

I am having a great time on the cheerleading squad although this is the part in the season when the cold becomes just a little much and the wind equally as rough. Luckily, though, we have new running suits for warmth and the cheering has been exciting this year.

 

In terms of my studies, I am very involved in my Marine and Environmental Sciences curriculum, conducting fish trawls on the river, presentations on Thames River fish populations, and discussing the importance of conservation of endangered marine species. It is weird, but I have found that between football, lacrosse, homework and studying, I really haven’t had much free time, but I am happy to say that despite my many weekends spent at the Academy, I have enjoyed the free Sunday evening yoga classes and just relaxing on campus. The fall colors are exceptional and I was lucky enough to get a room with a view of the river.

 

Parents’ Weekend is coming up and I am really looking forward to their visit. We are going to watch the football game and I am excited to show off our spirit with the cheerleaders.

 

GO BEARS, BEAT ENDICOTT!

 

In a Flash

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Corbett Photo Last year upperclassmen said it all the time. “Trust me after 4/c year this place flies by.” Here I sit with midterms behind me and Thanksgiving staring me down. I remember being in Swab Summer thinking it was the longest seven weeks of my life and now life is a steady stream flowing day to day. So what have I learned thus far in the semester?

 

Other than all the crazy electrical engineering knowledge that is being crammed in my brain, there have been a few Academy lessons. Like I said, this semester has flown by. After all, time stops for no man. Sometimes people become so busy and caught up in life you forget to just breathe and take in your surroundings. Looking around the Academy and across the Thames, all the trees have changed to their fall wardrobe of oranges, yellows, and reds. (Which, if you have never been to the Academy or New England, is truly breathtaking). Taking in the small moments is difficult but necessary to stay sane. If you don’t stay caught up in work you will just become overloaded, frustrated and stressed. I try to keep stress out as much as possible.

 

Being a 3/c is very different from being a 4/c. For obvious reasons such as: not having to square, not having to take out trash, etc. Bigger than that however, the respect that comes with the new title is relieving. 4/c look to you for advice, for help, and as someone who is above them who has the wisdom of a year under their belt, which is true. 3/c are the “friendlies.” We are not the enforcers or trainers. Our role is to set the example and help the 4/c pass the year. Now I might not know everything, but when I hear “Mr. Corbett sir” I am sure to stop and help however I can.

 

I feel like I usually give some kind of quote in my posts so I will leave you with “Every silver lining has a touch of grey.” – Grateful Dead. Everyone has plans. You have some sort of path of which you hope to travel. You can travel that silver lining all you want, but you have to understand that sometimes the path may be rocky, or you may stray off. If you push through the hard times and stay on that silver lining, you will reach your goals and ultimately live happier. The Academy was my silver lining and continues to be, but there are some hard times. You look to your left and right and see your shipmates alongside you to carry you through those tough times. The family aspect of this place could be a post on its own, so maybe next time. For now I am signing off.

Reach me at Shane.P.Corbett@uscga.edu.

 

More about Shane.

 

Three Parts of Third Class Summer

(Choosing the Coast Guard Academy, Just for Fun, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Sandri Photo Third class summer at the Academy is divided into three main portions: sailing on the cutter Eagle, experiencing time in the fleet/attending summer school, and going on leave. I was assigned to spend the first five weeks of my summer aboard Eagle followed by six weeks at Station Golden Gate.

 

Eagle was certainly an experience. Our days were filled with double four-hour watches, damage control trainings, working on required tasks such as star shooting and drawing the ship’s firemain system, learning the system of lines so we could help work the ship more efficiently, and of course prepping for in-port duty and liberty. Captain Pulver, the CO, said he wanted to keep us busy, and he definitely succeeded! Here are a few things that made Eagle memorable:

  • My division. Aboard the ship, we attended trainings and stood watches with a group of other 3/c cadets, all under the watch of a 1/c cadet. Although a midnight watch in the engine room may not seem like fun, we made it enjoyable by having discussions and playing lots of games. I couldn’t have survived the five weeks without them!
  • Sometimes, the FS (food service specialist) on duty would make pumpkin cinnamon rolls for people who had the night watch. This always made my night!
  • Spotting wildlife. The Atlantic Ocean is teeming with flying fish, and we would occasionally spot whales or dolphins. It was so exciting to spot them while standing lookout, or waiting during sail stations.
  • The water was colored such a brilliant electric blue around the Caribbean, no wonder there’s a paint color called Caribbean Blue! Not to mention the clarity…you could see directly to the bottom when we pulled into port.
  • Climbing up the masts to pull in or let down sails. The view was incredible, and this was a really special job we got to do.
  • The port calls were amazing. We walked through a 500-year-old fort in San Juan, snorkeled in a natural pool in Aruba, and danced with street musicians in the lively streets of Cozumel.
  • I got to know my classmates better. There are some awesome people in my class who I hadn’t really talked to before, but when you’re together on a 295-foot pirate boat, you get to know each other pretty well.
  • Disconnecting. When you’re underway, there’s no cell service or WIFI access, so we found other ways to entertain ourselves. Sometimes it reminded me of grade school days, in a good way. Frequent time-occupiers included the alphabet game, Never Have I Ever, and writing letters.

 

When we pulled into Miami, we went our separate ways. Three other cadets and I flew to Station Golden Gate in Sausalito, California. It was the busiest unit in the Coast Guard last year and is nestled next to its namesake bridge. These are just a few things from my time in the fleet:

  • The enlisted crew at the station was the best that I could ask for. They were able to more than competently get the job done while maintaining a relaxed atmosphere around the grounds. This was especially important because of the high-stress nature of cases around the San Francisco Bay area, and it was neat to see how the crew members manage themselves with little officer interaction. They were extremely knowledgeable and helpful as we worked on qualifying as communications watchstander and boat crew member for the 47-foot motor lifeboat.
  • I definitely got spoiled by Sausalito’s moderate climate and breathtaking views. There was time allotted for exercise almost every day, and I mostly used it to go on runs downtown. Sausalito is a small, artsy city across from San Francisco, and it was beautiful to run through.
  • SAR cases. We got to experience the life-saving service at the heart of the Coast Guard. No matter what time of day, when the alarm went off there was always a crew racing to the docks to save someone. On the days we were on the first responder boat, we would join the crew on cases. By the end of the summer, I had gotten to pick up kite surfers in distress, tow boats, recover bridge jumpers, break in comms watch for a suspected drug interdiction, and so much more.
  • The station dog, Sierra, was always there to take on walks and play with. The crew was allowed to bring in their own dogs too, and once we took three of them on a four-mile walk downtown.
  • Weekends were ours to use as we wanted. I spent time visiting family and friends in the area, hiked Muir Woods, toured San Francisco and spent one weekend working on qualifications.
  • Scary movie night! Somehow I agreed to watch The Conjuring for Scary Movie Monday at the station…never again.

 

3/c summer was definitely the best Academy summer yet. It feels like we packed so much training into the 11 weeks, which were followed by three weeks of leave. After this culminating end to 4/c year, I’m excited to see what the new year has in store!

 

More about Eva.

 

Getting Involved is Fair-ly Easy (Cadet Activities Fair)

(Extracurricular Activities and Faith-Based Involvement, Just for Fun, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Sherman Photo We have many clubs and activities here at the Coast Guard Academy. And we have a fun way to find out what extracurricular options are available each year: the Cadet Activities Fair! It’s on the Thursday of the first week of school (sorry for the delay…I had some technical difficulties while editing). This video is a fun exposition of that event. Hear about anything you’re interested in?

*Special thanks to artist Har Megiddo for the use of his music in this video.

Justin's video blog YouTube Icon

 


More about Justin.

 

Getting Settled and Getting Fit

(Athletics, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Racz Photo It’s crazy how I have been back for close to seven weeks. It seems like only yesterday I was stepping foot onto the Barque Eagle getting ready for its Canadian cruise. As I have finally set into the academic year, I’m noticing a lot of differences from last year. The academics are a little more challenging and the responsibility thrust upon us is greater. Though all of these changes are easy to control and handle, I still am finding myself altering my approach to this academic year. Also, since I am no longer rowing, I’ve noticed that I have a lot of more free time on my hands. Though some of it is spent watching Netflix or surfing social media (which isn’t the best use of my time), I do my best to balance my academics and fun. My dad always told me, work hard play hard.

 

One activity I’m now participating in is Crossfit. For those that don’t know what that is, Crossfit is essentially a mix of Olympic lifting, cardio, body weight exercises, and circuit training. It pushes you to your limit both mentally and physically during every workout you take part in. The fact that I can get stronger and better fit in less time is one of the reasons why I enjoy it so much. I try to go every day to the Crossfit gym in New London with one of my good friends at the Academy. After only going for a few weeks, I can already see beneficial results. As I continue, I hope to gain overall strength and fitness.

 

Again, if you have any questions about the Academy, 3/c year, 4/c year, or even Crossfit don’t hesitate to email me. I wish everyone who has applied or who is currently applying the best of luck.

 

More about Benjamin.

 

Halloween at the CGA

(Choosing the Coast Guard Academy, Just for Fun, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Stowes Photo Halloween at the Coast Guard Academy is unlike anything you would experience in normal civilian life. To start, instead of getting to decorate houses with scary decorations, we decorate our small rooms with as many decorations as we can fit and put buckets of candy outside our rooms. Some people go all in, and even walking into their room can be a challenge. Then there are people like me who don’t decorate at all.

 

On a company level, there are actually some fun activities to do. On the Wednesday before Halloween, my company had a party. We set up a few tables and played a “cider pong” tournament, which drew a lot of attention. Also, we decorated the dayroom with tons of scary spider webs and Halloween decorations. As we decorated, people enjoyed a massive bucket of candy, pop corn, warm apple cider, and caramel apples. The party was pretty fun, and it was a much welcomed break from the monotony of the week.

 

On the Thursday before Halloween, the corps had a chance to participate in the festivities together. At 1830, we had our annual Halloween dinner. The entire corps got dressed up in their costumes and headed down to the wardroom for a festive dinner and the infamous costume competition. This year, the costumes were awesome. Some costumes were really scary, and others were ridiculously funny. Personally, I dressed up as Brad Pitt from World War Z. Why? Well, my rugby teammates decided that we were all going to dress up as different Brad Pitts from the movies he has appeared in. We had over 30 of our guys dress up as different Brad Pitts, and we all sat together at the dinner. The meal was pretty good, but the most fun part was the costume competition. There were several categories for the competition: most creative, scariest, most nautical, and best group. The winner of each category is whoever receives the loudest support, which is a sight to see in itself. The rugby team went up for best group costume, and we each introduced ourselves as “Brad Pitt from___”. Surprisingly, we were very well received, and we won the group contest. That was awesome.

 

After the meal, hundreds of cadets headed up the “hill” for treats and prizes. The “hill” is where ADM Stosz, the Commandant of Cadets, Assistant Superintendent, Master Chief, and Command Chaplain all live. Each house was giving out handfuls of candy, and the Commandant of Cadets was handing out prizes including: long weekends, late racks, and other rewards. I ended up getting a free pass for me and three friends to go to Monday night football, which is typically reserved for seniors only.

 

After visiting the hill, I went back to the barracks to walk around seeing everyone’s costumes and to check out the parties going on. Overall, I had a lot of fun. Halloween at CGA is very different from what I would normally do at home, but I really enjoy it. The weeks here are long, and celebrations like Halloween and Thanksgiving are great stress relievers. Plus, it’s fun to dress up with all my friends and go have fun for a night, instead of studying or doing work.

 

If you have any questions about any of my blogs, please feel free to email me anytime at Hunter.D.Stowes@uscga.edu. I look forward to hearing from you. Take care!

 

More about Hunter.

 

Fall Sports, Liberty and Diving

(Athletics, Just for Fun, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Cantrell Photo I am happy to report that it was another fun and enjoyable month of my senior year! The football game versus Merchant Marine was the best game I have been to at the Academy. The day started with soccer, a freshman scored the winning goal near the end of the game. Volleyball was simultaneously playing and also won. We then sat in the stands and watched the football team bring home the victory! It was such an exciting game with so much passion and emotion. I also went to New York this month to visit my aunt, uncle, and cousin. It is hard being so far from home, but it is really great to have family close to me. They have been an awesome support system throughout my time at the Academy and I am truly grateful to be so close to them. I also went to a Brantley Gilbert concert with my friends, which was a ton of fun and a great night out on liberty!

 

I know it seems like I only talk about my weekend adventures, but I promise I do school work too! The work load has definitely been picking up this last month and with diving added into my schedule my time management skills have been kicking in. The test and papers have started, but I am not feeling overwhelmed. Diving has been great so far, as of last week I have completed all of my dives that I did at the end of last season. This is huge for me and gives me motivation for a great last year! The schedule is packed from here on out and my weekends are about to be consumed with diving meets, but I wouldn’t want it any other way.

 

More about Sara.

 

Fall Is Here!!

(Academics, Athletics, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Duplessis Photo As always, times blows by here at school. It seems like I just got back from summer break, and here I am looking midterms in the eye. So far, senior year has been pretty awesome. I’m taking amazing classes, and it’s also not bad being able to go out during the week (and not having to worry about catching the bus for transportation since we’re allowed to have cars now).

 

Senior year is also the best nautical science class year. We mainly use the simulators or go out onto the T-boats in the Thames to practice being Deck Watch Officers. We took most of the basic principles last year as well, so we have a ton of time to actually exercise what we’ve learned, which makes the class entertaining and applicable to our futures. We’re about halfway through my last year as a college soccer player as well. It’s so weird to think that I’ll never play at this level again, or with this awesome team of incredible players.

 

Although I’ll miss my close friends, teammates, and coaches, I am still looking forward to starting my life and career as a Coast Guard officer. Being able to shadow an ensign this past summer has gotten me pumped about heading out to the fleet, and about the people I’ll be working with and for. About 230 days to go until graduation in May…it can’t come soon enough!

 

More about Lindsay.

 

Weekly 1/c Summer Reflection

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Meyers PhotoWEEK 01

 

During the first week aboard the Joshua Appleby (a 17- foot buoy tender based out of St. Petersburg, Florida), I have already learned a lot about the ship and am well on my way to an in-port watchstander qualification. This qualification will actually mean something, as once you qualify, you become one of two people required to stay onboard the boat, and are directly responsible for the safety of the ship and the people aboard it. Because of the small crew size, some of the qualifications I’m tasked with doing by the Academy will probably not get done. For example, instead of getting Damage Control Personnel Qualification Standard (DCPQS), this boat has what’s called SEOPS, which covers a lot what is in DCPQS, but is intended for smaller crews. Sections of this are required to qualify as in-port watchstander, which should hopefully count toward some points of my DCPQS qualifications. As far as the time I’ve spent on board, the boat just got back from a long trip, so there are only ever two people on board the boat at a time (the watch) while everyone else is home or on liberty. Instead of letting this time go by and waiting for the entire crew to come back to start my qualifications, I’ve been utilizing this time to knock out as many sign-offs as possible. At the end of week one, I’m already almost done with the sign-offs, but still need to do four more of my seven engineering drawings, some more SEOPS material, and read assorted manuals. I came in with the set goal of working hard no matter what and trying to help the crew as much as possible. So far I’m well on my way to doing this and have already given up countless hours of potential liberty in Florida to get qualified sooner. My main hope is that command will see through the list of qualification required by the Academy and see that I’m working as hard as I possibly can to do what I can get done.

 

WEEK 02 

 

I’ve now had the opportunity to meet the whole crew and I’ve already learned a ton from them! Specifically, I’ve worked extensively with BM3 Bryant in the operations department on navigation briefs, track lines, and aids to navigation planning. We got underway this past week and I got my first taste of what the black hull life is like. I was able to drive the ship through several buoy evolutions from start to finish as well as some restricted waters steaming, which were both great opportunities. My CO is absolutely awesome and I have a lot of leadership qualities to learn from him. If I could someday be an officer of his caliber, I would be a happy Coast Guardsman. Another thing we did over the course of the past week was an open house for the public. We moored up at sector and people came on board for tours. I thought that I would be able to offer little to the public as I had only been on board for a few days at that point, but was a huge asset in promoting the Academy. I had five or six individuals who were interested in attending the Academy approach me to ask questions and I did my best to give them some insight into what it’s like. I gave out my contact info to them and have actually been corresponding with a couple of them. On another note, I’ve been able to get off the ship a little bit and have seen the local beach and explored the area. St. Pete is a very nice area with great weather, but is pretty limited in terms of what there is to do. You can go to the beach during the day, or go to the bars at night, and since I’d rather not drink while I’m out by myself, I usually go back to the boat at night to work on qualifications and watch TV on the mess deck. There was a free concert one night that I went to; Bastille was playing in the local park for the public. Overall, week two has been a success and I’m starting to get more comfortable around the boat.

 

"Weekly 1/c Summer Reflection (Continued) PDF 

 

More about James.