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CADET BLOGS

cadet blogs

Being a Mentor

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Chang Photo I have two official mentors here; two people who experienced the Academy years before I did but still went through the same obstacles. They’re a couple years apart, one works here and the other travels the world. However, although they pursued different post-Academy endeavors, I’ve learned so much from their personal stories and their actions of taking the time to mentor me. Having a mentor here is extremely important because mentors make you think about your actions and motives. Frankly, it’s less about oversight and more about guidance. And while it takes time to build trust and be comfortable with talking to someone more experienced; sometimes self-reflection is easier when someone else is holding the mirror.

 

Through the year I’ve seen myself develop into more of a mentor figure. One of the most important things I’ve learned is that, at least in Chase Hall, strong mentorship takes time. At least one party has to take the first step in reaching out, and interactions should be consistent and positive. Ideally, I hope that most underclass feel like they’ve walked away with something worthwhile after talking to me, be it a lingering thought, more motivation, or even a better mood. I’m still learning what questions to ask as a mentee, and how to answer questions as a mentor, and hopefully I’ll never stop.

 

More about Olivia.

 

Snow Day 2017 - VIDEO

(Just for Fun, Class of 2020) Permanent link
Kim Photo On February 9th, the U.S. Coast Guard Academy had its first “snow day” of the 2016-17 academic year. Because the weather conditions were too severe, the Academy closed its doors, cancelling classes. This meant that the Corps of Cadets were left to themselves for a day (or days) of productive studying and relaxing. For some, it meant a stress-relieving time in the snow.

This video was made in conjunction with soon-to-be-blogger 4/c Nathan Ropp.

Royalty-free music used:
"First Walk" by GoSoundtrack http://www.gosoundtrack.com/
Creative Commons — Attribution 4.0 International — CC BY 4.0
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...
Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/ezKeq6HHyVE

"Road Trip" by Joakim Karud https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud
Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/vpssnpH_H4c

Matthew and Nathan's video blog YouTube Icon

 


More about Matthew.

 

Keeping the 4/c Busy

(Academics, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2020) Permanent link
Smith Photo Well, today is Friday. That puts an end to a long January week. The sun is setting sooner, colors is going off earlier, and the trees have lost their leaves. Winter is here, and months dotingly called “the dark ages” have begun at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. People from sunnier states such as California or Hawaii, or in some cases Haiti and Mexico, may be shocked at the weather and have difficulty adjusting through these upcoming months. However, being from Maryland, I’m all but too familiar with the dark days of January and February.

 

However, the Academy manages to keep the 4/c very busy. In just two weeks in being back from winter break we have already gotten deep into our new classes, attended entertaining presentations on the various majors at the Academy (as we are going to be officially declaring it in the next few weeks), and have received our official Class of 2020 boards packet. In just a mere 4½ months, the 4/c will turn into 3/c, which means carry-on! You can already feel the anticipation in Chase Hall, all of us knowing that we made it through the first semester here, and we just have a few more obstacles to overcome before we get there.

 

What is Boards? Well, if you peer through the archives of cadet blogs, you can find many more cadets before me talk about it when they were blogging as 4/c. In the Coast Guard fleet, for enlisted personnel to advance ranks, they must usually take and pass a written test followed by an oral test to move on. At the Coast Guard Academy, we replicate the process for 4/c to understand and better appreciate what the enlisted do to get where they are. This year is the first year they’ve done a written Boards test and an oral Boards test – usually, it has only been an oral test. As the 4/c go through the Boards process, we will begin to earn back privileges. When my shipmates and I pass Boards, we will earn the privilege to write on our whiteboards posted outside our rooms, to play music aloud, to use social media, and eventually experience carry-on.

 

Considering the past – and realizing I’ve been at the Coast Guard Academy for just eight months so far – I can say I’ve learned so much. I’m certainly not the same girl I was on June 26, 2016 (the day before R-Day.) As scary as Boards seems to some, I’m excited to do it. I’m preparing in every way I can, with all my shipmates in the great Class of 2020. We’re all going to lean on each other to make it through, and eventually, we’ll all be trading in our green shields for red shields, as one awesome class.

 

More about Sarah.

 

New Year, New Semester: Back to School at the CGA

(Academics, Athletics, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Hosley Photo Well, we are back to school after some well-deserved vacation time. I spent my winter leave with my family on a trip to Miami and the Florida Keys which was absolutely incredible. After all that sun, sand, and salt water it was veryyyyy difficult to come back to Connecticut, but here we are back at school. A new semester is always exciting and I can’t wait to see what this one has in store for me. The big buzz around base this time of year is where people want to go for their summer assignments. It may seem a bit early to be thinking about summer, but Cadet Training has released the eResumes and everyone is talking about what Coast Guard units they want to experience, where they want to go, and what they want to accomplish in the fleet this summer as third class and first class. As a soon-to-be first class, this summer is extremely exciting. I have heard back from the Marine and Environmental Sciences department that I was chosen for the internship I applied to in Sitka, Alaska!!! I am crazy excited to be going to Alaska this summer to work on scientific research while experiencing life in the Coast Guard. It is an amazing opportunity to take part in this internship while living at the Coast Guard Air Station in Sitka. I hope to take full advantage of this experience by seeing what life is like at the air station and by getting on as many flights as possible!

 

In addition, the spring 2017 lacrosse season officially starts tomorrow and I could not be more excited for that as well. We have been practicing like crazy in our off season and can’t wait to show our coach what we’ve been working on. As a captain this season, I look forward to bringing my team together and setting a precedent for the future of Coast Guard lacrosse while leaving behind a legacy of hard work, family, and unity within our team. Stay tuned for updates on CGA Women’s Lax as the season goes on and happy New Year everyone!

 

More about Cece.

 

Home Away From Home

(Overcoming Challenges, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2020) Permanent link
Noble Photo As an international cadet from the Philippines, it is very hard for me to go home and see my family. I only get to see them once a year. It can be difficult at times because I tend to miss them a lot and I miss a ton of events such as my uncle’s wedding, my mom’s birthday, and my dad’s birthday. Sometimes, I feel like I am alone and have no family. Although I have lots of friends in the Academy and lots of people who look after me such as my company officers, company chiefs, professors, and upperclassmen, I still long for the day where I can just go home, sit back, hug my parents, and just have a break from all the rigors of the Academy. Unfortunately, this scenario is no longer possible because I am 8,000 miles away from them and my home.

 

The closest thing that gives me that break and that refreshment is going to visit my sponsor family. I am thankful for this program at the Coast Guard Academy has because without it, I do not know if I would have survived the first semester of 4th class year. My sponsor families were my driving force and my inspiration every time I feel like giving up. Yes, I have a country to represent and my family back home as my main source of strength but my sponsor families gives me that hope and rekindles my fire inside every single week. Every message they send and encouraging moments we spend together helps me feel like I can take on the world and I can take on every challenge that the Academy gives me. They truly made my transition to the military community better and one that is unforgettable. They made my life in the Academy very rewarding and very fulfilling.

 

Each of my sponsor families is unique and I am thankful for them. My first sponsor family who was selected for me by the Academy is very accommodating and very loving. It almost feels like they are my real parents. They also have a son who is an officer in the Coast Guard so they also feel like I am their son. Aside from all the support and the help they provide, one thing I love the most is how great the food is in their house. Every single meal they cook for me is like a taste of heaven, the sea and its lore. They owned a restaurant before so this is why they are really good at their craft. Moreover, it was one of the best in Connecticut so they really make delicious meals. To add to that, they made me one of the most scrumptious lobster bisque I have ever tasted in my life. My second sponsor family has a Filipino background and thus I love spending time with their family because they give me a sense of my country and a feeling of familiarity with my culture and my nationality. They also cook the best Filipino meals and they provide me encouragement that I cannot get from anyone else. It feels very special when I hear it in my own native language and the comfort of their household just makes me feel refreshed and renewed. My third sponsor family is a family that has both a Filipino heritage and a military background. They work in the U.S. Navy and are currently stationed in the Naval Sub Base. They are a young couple so it is very easy to relate with them, joke around, and laugh with. They are very adventurous so they have toured me around from Vermont, Rhode Island, New York, and Boston. Just like my other sponsor families, they cook good Filipino food and they give me a boost and renewed mindset.

 

By signing up for the program, I wanted to surround myself with good people who want me to succeed and this is what a got. These people have always made me feel special every time I am with them. I am thankful that I am just in my first year in the Academy because I still have a lot of time with them and a lot of adventures to go on with them. I appreciate that they accepted a young cadet like me and I will always have a grateful for their generosity and willingness to help me with my 200-week-long journey. I am glad that the Academy values strong familial bonds. These relationships not only last for my stay here in New London but also for a lifetime after I go back to my home country.

 

Thank you for your time,
Go CGA
Go Sponsorship Program
And Go Bears!

 

More about Eric.

 

Staying Civil

(Academics, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Sakowicz Photo Once when I was in middle school, I told my father I couldn't do math because I was a girl. Girls weren’t made to be as smart as boys, and we sure couldn’t do math. My Dad was livid! He refused to allow me to believe that, and spent the following hour informing me that a woman could do anything, especially math and assisted me in finishing my homework. I spent the next six years sprinting through science and math classes eager to learn and prove my value, I was good, I could do it, and I knew it.

 

Flash forward to finals at the end of 4/c year, I walk out of my Calculus II final in tears, praying for a high enough grade to squeak by so I would not have to come back for summer school. I sit down at my computer with relief, only to log on and open up an email from my Calculus II teacher addressed to myself and my company officer. I had passed my final, but I had only passed the class by the skin of my teeth. The email on my grade could be boiled down to one heart wrenching statement.

 

"Suggest you consider a major other that engineering with the effort you’re putting in now."

 

I was destroyed, I had only just switched my major to civil engineering and it was all I wanted to do, it spoke to me. This email haunted me through my third class summer, followed me through every watch on Eagle and Dauntless, and on the train ride back home. The second my Mother picked me up from the train station I begged her to bring me to the bookstore. I bought a Calculus for Dummies book and got down to work. Every day I watched how-to calculus video and pushed my way through every problem in that book. There were four weeks until I started Multivariable Calculus and I was going to go into that class guns blazing.

 

It took almost losing what I wanted to realize how hard you have to work to have it and stay at the Academy. I took that email statement with me to class every day, it no longer haunted me; it was my motivation, my driving force. I worked hard on homework, went for extra help if I needed it, and crushed every test that came across my desk. Like Theodore Roosevelt said, “Nothing that is worth doing is ever easy.”

 

I can only now reflect on how important these events were, to have led me to my current station, a female Civil Engineering student, having passed the FE standing on the edge of graduation knowing that only 100% effort will get you what you want, no matter who or what you are.

 

More about Emily.

 

Faculty that Care

(Academics, Choosing the Coast Guard Academy, Class of 2020) Permanent link
Wheeler Photo Never before have I had the privilege of interacting with and being taught by such an incredible group of officers and professors. The instructors and staff at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy truly go above and beyond their job description to make sure that cadets here succeed. It is not at all uncommon for Calculus or Navigation teachers to stay after-hours until 10:00 p.m. tutoring students, ensuring that they fully comprehend certain material and are prepared for upcoming projects and exams.

 

BIt is these instructors that sacrifice their time that could be spent at home with family and loved ones, all for the sake of our education that make the Academy the best school in the nation. Not only do they commit time and effort, but the professors explain the material in ways that adapt to the learning styles of each cadet. For me, I know that math and STEM courses aren’t my strongest subjects, so when my teachers talk with me after class and explain various concepts in ways I can grasp and actually perform myself, I’m blown away! Never before have I been more confident in my abilities to do my Calculus and Physics homework, but also be able to fully understand it and explain it to others as a result of my instructor’s passion for teaching.

 

More about Pat.

 

Change is Possible

(Academics, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Eshleman Photo At the beginning of every new semester at the United States Coast Guard Academy, I always seem to expect that the previous semester and the new are going to be relatively similar. But no matter what year or season it is, I get a week into the new school semester and realize how quickly things change at the CGA. Last semester I had all engineering classes besides my Nautical Science III course. This semester I only have three engineering classes, and then I am also taking Atmospheres (a marine environmental science course), Personal Finance, Criminal Justice, and Personal Defense II. Overall, my workload, at least for now, seems to have slightly lightened. This gives me the opportunity to fill some of my time with what I choose.

 

So far, my days seem to go with school until 1500, workout until 1700, then dinner, Glee Club, meetings with the Guidon (the 2/c in charge of the 4/c cadets within Golf Company), and then more homework and bed. I applied for the privilege of being an MAA, or Master at Arms, for Golf and got it. This means that I work with the Guidon, one of my good friends, and the 4/c (freshman) to help develop them, while also working with the rest of the company staff to keep the company running smoothly and initiate new training ideas. What I am enjoying most about this semester is getting to understand how the Academy truly runs, and that the reason things get done around here a lot of the time is because cadets initiate and are it behind the scenes. It makes me realize that if you put the time and effort in, change is possible, and I can carry this lesson with me into my first unit after graduation.

 

More about Hannah.

 

Fall Semester in Review

(Academics, Just for Fun, Class of 2019) Permanent link
Silliman Photo The fall semester was a long one and I’m certainly glad it is now over. So far during 3/c year I felt like I managed myself a lot better, but it certainly brought many new challenges.

 

Spring semester last year, I set the goal of getting a term GPA of 3.15 and making the Dean’s List. I did that last semester, but doing that again was harder than I expected. For most of the first half of the semester, I felt all my grades were where I wanted them, but quickly found out I had a lot of improvements to make if I wanted to stay on the Dean’s List. I really struggled with math this semester and my English grade was also not where I wanted it. Over the next two months I put a lot of time into my schoolwork and was able to raise the grades in most of my classes. I achieved my goal of staying on the Dean’s List, but getting there certainly had its sacrifices.

 

I felt that I did not spend as much time off as I wish I could have. I spent a lot of time on most weekends doing work. But I did march in the Veteran’s Day Parade in New York and that was a lot of fun. Being close to home, I also managed to take an extra weekend visit my family and was able to I bring friends from school.

 

Thanksgiving allowed me to catch up with some friends, but it seemed like a tease because I was home for only the brief period of five days and I had other work to do while I was there. After Thanksgiving I had just under two weeks left before winter break. With a lot of hard work, I was able to get out of the Physics final, leaving me with only two exams to take. After the first two days of final exams, I was home.

 

For Christmas, Golf Company went crazy with Christmas decorations. There were a lot of rooms that you could walk into and they did not feel like Chase Hall. I hung lights around my room, decorated a Christmas tree, and my door. I also put up a little Christmas village on the empty desk in my room.

 

Having two 4/c this semester gave me a lot of perspective and it was weird thinking that was me only a year ago. At the end of my semester, the other 3/c and I evaluated their performance at the end of the semester and they both did well for their first term. I did better than I expected and received the highest military score for an academic term yet.

 

Thus far, I have seen a couple friends from home over break, going skiing, hiking, and now I am off on a family trip to Great Britain. This coming semester I think will be a lot of fun. I have a ski pass to Killington to get away and here at the Academy I will have three different 4/c I am in charge of. My classes are also going to be more career-specific this semester as I am now done with general math and English classes. 125 weeks to go until commissioning, and Cadre Summer is on the horizon. I can’t wait!

 

More about Derek.

 

The Final Four

(Athletics, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Friedman Photo Before winter leave, I had the opportunity to do something I never thought I would do…go to the Final 4. The Coast Guard Academy Women’s Rugby team won upsets in the round of 16 and the elite 8 to have a first ever birth in the national championship. Needless to say our entire team was thrilled. During the practice before we left for the Final 4, the Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent came and wished us luck. The next day we boarded the bus for the trip down to South Carolina.

 

After an overnight bus ride that consisted of a lot of movies and restless sleep, we arrived in South Carolina. Friday night we checked in with USA Rugby and got ready for our games over the weekend. Even though we lost both games, we still came out 4th in the nation, a big increase from our ranking as 14th in the nation last season.

 

I am incredibly proud of everything our team has accomplished, and while I didn’t enjoy sleeping on a bus, I hope I get to do it again next season, and come back with a national championship.

 

If you have any questions feel free to email me Jill.M.Friedman@uscga.edu.

 

More about Jill.

 

Whoa, I Actually Know All This Stuff!

(Academics, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Horacek Photo Finals week: words that strike fear into the heart of any college kid. A month’s worth of exams crammed into a few days to hopefully prove that you have, in fact, been awake at least 75% of the time for the past semester. However, despite its reputation for being a week of certain doom, in my experience finals haven’t been all that bad here. Some classes will even let you validate a final if you have a high enough score, usually in the 90-93 range. If you’re lucky, you’ll validate or not have finals on the last few days and get to leave early! If you’re curious, here’s how a typical finals week goes:

 

After the last few days of school (which are mostly filled with a few reviews and course evaluations) we have study and conference day. This is an empty day set aside for you to get with your teachers one last time if you need to and get yourself organized for the next few days. The next day, finals begin! We get to wake up a little bit later (0730, woohoo!) and then there are two testing blocks, morning and/or afternoon for five days (give or take, I had a test Friday, Monday, Tuesday, and validated my Wednesday final so I was fortunate and got to leave early). That’s it! All you have to do is study and take a few tests and, let’s be honest, that definitely doesn’t take up a whole day. Most of my (awesome) teachers sponsored 1-2 hour review sessions where we went over the basics of the whole class, and I personally studied no more than an hour or two outside of that for each test. The rest of my time was filled with sleep, Skyrim, and Netflix. All in all, the finals themselves were fine; the worst part is being so close to going home and having to wait to take a test before you can!

 

But now, as I’m finally riding the plane back to the land of warmth and enchiladas (Texas), I’m realizing how much got crammed into my head this semester. Most of my friends and I got to the point in our studying where it was like, “Whoa, I actually know all this stuff!” Except Electrical Circuits and Machines, electricity is still difficult for me. But I still knew enough to get a decent grade on the test! And the farther into this education I get, the more realistic the problems are getting, and the more I realize that I’ll actually use this stuff I’m learning in the real world. This unfortunately means I’ll have to use calculus in the real world… But for now, it’s time to enjoy the break! Happy holidays everyone!

 

More about Brandon.

 

Greetings from the USCG Fleet!

(Just for Fun, Life as a Junior Officer, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Belanger Photo So, I have not written as blog since right before I graduated so I thought I would send in a quick little message. It has been quite a journey since graduation. Well, I got stationed in Kodiak, Alaska. It defiantly wasn’t my top choice due to the fact that I am a Florida boy, but while we were in port over the summer I got to explore the island and take in all of its beauty. I really enjoyed all of the hikes and fishing that I got to do over the three months I was in Kodiak. We left for dry dock in the middle of August and that is when my journey began. I arrived in Seattle at the end of August and from there I went on a temporary assigned duty (TAD) to the CGC Seneca out of Boston.

 

It was a great experience sailing back in the warmth of the Caribbean with a brief stop in Roatan, Honduras. Honestly, you think Honduras and immediately disregard it but it was one of the best islands that I have ever visited. It was friendly, reasonably priced, and beautiful. It is home to one of the largest reefs in the world and from most spots you can just walk into the water from the beach and swim to them.

 

After that tour wrapped up in the beginning of September, I had the opportunity to go back to the Academy and help out in the Nautical Science department on the training vessels that the cadets train on. I was there for two weeks working with the instructors and 2/c and it was a blast. Honestly, I was hesitant at first but it provided me with the opportunity to not only catch up with friends but also get better at thinking further ahead when driving a ship. I really owe a great deal of thanks to CDR Mike Turdo and his team in the Naut Sci department for accommodating me for those two weeks.

 

From there I travelled down to Charleston, South Carolina to the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) to begin boarding officer school. I honestly have to say it was the best time I have had in the Coast Guard so far. This training provides boarding team members with the opportunity to learn more about Coast Guard and U.S. policy when conducting boardings in the high seas and in U.S. waters. We had liberty on the weekends to explore the area. It was great working with other classmates and enlisted members from different parts of the country and getting to know each and every one of them.

 

From there I flew back to Seattle where Munro was still dry dock for a short week and I was off again (TAD) to the CGC Legare. I honestly have to say that I enjoyed every moment on board. We conducted fishery patrols and I got to experience a .50 caliber shoot along with a MK-75 shoot (that’s the big gun on front of a 270’). We also got to conduct helicopter operations and a large number of small boat operations. It was truly rewarding. I got to finish a lot of my progress on board in regard to my underway deckwatch officer qualification. I also got to catch up with my classmates that were also on board.

 

You think this would end my adventure, but it doesn’t! At the beginning of January, I flew from the Legare on a MH-60 inbound for Myrtle Beach. After spending a day in Myrtle Beach I flew up to Norfolk, Virginia. My flight wasn’t scheduled until later in the week so it gave me a few days in Virginia, an area that has a large Coast Guard presence. I was able to catch up with a few friends, along with my academic advisor and professor from the Academy. I departed at 0300 on a Friday inbound for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where I met up with yet another 270’ from Virginia. As of right now I am currently underway on the CGC Forward with yet more classmates! We have had an exciting patrol so far and have had a busy schedule. My classmates on board are all studying for their boards (which is a test) for their deck watch officer letter. I am close to having mine as well so it has been great studying with them!

 

Since graduation I have travelled over 10,000 miles and have had the opportunity to meet up with tons of classmates all over the East Coast. It has been quite a trip so far, but I am ready to head back to my ship. Hopefully, that will happen soon—but in the life of a junior officer, you never know!

 

If you have any questions regarding the academy or life as a Coast Guard junior officer, please don’t hesitate to shoot me an email at Nathan.D.Belanger@uscg.mil!

 

More about Nathan.

 

Lasts and Firsts, Same Inspiration

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Glick Photo This semester is filled with many lasts. We have our last PFEs, the last first day of school, the last set of classes, the last cadet assignments, the last spring break. It is also a semester of many firsts. We have submitted our first list of preferred billets, our first permanent change of station, and the first time that we will go into the Coast Guard as officers. It was surreal submitting my billet list, and coming to the realization of how close graduation actually is. It’s crazy to think how slow but yet how fast time has flown by here at the Academy. I am excited to see what the future brings, yet I am still making sure to enjoy the present—like passing my last PFE of all time!

 

This semester I am back on Regimental Staff, serving this time as the Regimental Chief of Staff. This means that I am the supervisor of the planning staff and affinity councils, and I serve as third in the cadet chain of command. It is a lot of work, but it is fulfilling to have the Commandant of Cadets’ ear on many issues facing cadets, and to stand up for what is right. What motivates me to wake up in the morning are the underclassmen that also get up every day to face their many firsts that they are experiencing. Despite the newness of their routines, difficult general education classes, and coming back from that first big break of their Academy experience, they too wake up each day unfazed and eager to face the day. Serving them as their leader motivates me, because if they are able to do it, so should I.

 

More about William.

 

Bears Baseball

(Athletics, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Cannon Photo As baseball season quickly approaches one final time, I think it is good to look back on the things I have learned as a pitcher on the Bears baseball team. Three big takeaways come to mind when I think of the countless hours I have spent with this tight-knit group of guys, and it just may surprise you.

 

First of all, always come prepared with snacks. More specifically, bring snacks for the bullpen to enjoy. This duty usually falls on the freshmen pitchers on cold days out in the bullpen. Snacks include: Dots, Goldfish, chips and dip, and potentially pizza on a few occasions. The options are endless, but this always helps pass the time when the wind chill is well below freezing.

 

Second, your teammates are your boys. When I look at my class, we have not lost any recruited players due to one key factor: sticking together. We help each other stay out of trouble, and we develop bonds through trips like the one to Fort Myers Beach, Florida during spring break.

 

Third, you need to have thick skin in order to survive on a college baseball team. We roast each other on a constant basis, and the jokes toward each other are endless. At the end of the day, I will be a better officer from my experiences on this team. While we do enjoy giving each other a hard time, you will not find a closer group of guys on campus.

 

More about Colton.

 

A Whole Semester

(Choosing the Coast Guard Academy, Just for Fun, Class of 2020) Permanent link
Farlow Photo I can’t believe it has been a whole semester since the end of Swab Summer and now I sit anxiously waiting to start my second semester with new classes and new challenges. Now that my classmates and I have figured out how to be fourth class, we must start thinking about passing boards and becoming third class. We will also find out where our summer assignments will be and what company we will be moved to for the remainder of our cadet careers. This semester will bring a new set of challenges, but in the end rewards, and together as a class we will make it.

 

On a side note, being from Texas I have seen very little snow in my life and the first weekend back from winter leave we got almost 6 inches of snow and it was one of the craziest things I have ever experienced. The last time I had seen snow was when I visited the Academy as a senior in high school almost a year ago, and decided to make this place my home for the next four years. With first semester and Swab Summer behind me, I know I made the right choice. I really struggled to make a decision on where to attend college and after returning from winter leave and gearing up for second semester, I could not be happier with my decision.

 

Go Bears!

 

More about Francesca.