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cadet blogs

I'm Designing an Icebreaker

(Academics, Class of 2018, Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering) Permanent link
Eshleman Photo This semester has been a whirlwind. We were assigned our Capstone groups for the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering major almost as soon as we returned to the Academy after summer training. I am part of a group of four who are working on creating a medium icebreaker with a focus on scientific research. For the first couple weeks, we concentrated on creating our design philosophy, and now we are moving on to actually developing our icebreaker using Rhino, a computer program that allows us to build a ship hull. Initially, I experienced some major struggles using the software, but thankfully after many hours in the ship design lab, I am slowly becoming more proficient at the program, and it is amazing to see ideas come to life.

 

Our Capstone group has also undertaken a yearlong interview/photo/social media initiative with the Public Affairs Office following our project. Last week, we were interviewed in the Henriques Room in Hamilton Hall. We were given the opportunity to speak with the Public Affairs personnel about our project and plans. Getting interview experience and public speaking practice, I believe, will help me immensely next year when I become an ensign, and getting to hear my groupmates talk about their outlook on the project was eye-opening as well.

 

Well, I realize this post has been almost entirely about academics but, presently, that is what my life is most centered around. Don’t get me wrong, military trainings, Glee Club, Fairwinds, friends, and athletics are still an essential part of my daily routine, but like me, completing our Capstone project is what most first class cadets are focused on. Have a great week, and feel free to email me any questions about anything! Hannah.M.Eshleman@uscga.edu.

 

More about Hannah.

 

1/c Life

(Academics, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Martorell Crespo Photo So far, life as a first class cadet is not bad. As a 1/c cadet, I am held to a higher standard than everyone else and we, as a class, are the leaders of the Corps of Cadets. I was given the opportunity to be a division officer and actually have the authority to set high expectations for our division members and even myself to complete our division’s goals. Although it is nice to lead, it is also a challenge because not only do I have to be aware of the members in my division, but also manage my own responsibilities.

 

As a firstie, I have a lot of work to do in the barracks but also in academics, especially with my Capstone project. In your last year at the Academy, you get assigned a major project that you have to work on throughout the semester and it’s not easy. Not only you will have to put a lot of work in it to finish with a successful project, but it will require some late nights and even no sleep on other nights. But overall, life as a 1/c cadet is fun and challenging. Even though you have a lot to worry about, the motivation to graduate and become an ensign is what keeps everyone’s hopes up!

 

More about Irene.

 

Allow Me to Break the Ice

(Academics, Choosing the Coast Guard Academy, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Chen Photo The fall semester has started and let me tell you what a doozy it has been. Last semester, I was informed that I will be part of an advanced research project with two of my classmates for the 2017-2018 year. This project is part of our Government major capstone requirement. My classmates and I were selected to do a project focused on the Arctic. Over the summer, I was given some readings in order to have some basic knowledge on the situation in the Arctic.

 

During the first few days of school, our group was told that we were going to Iceland to kick off our research project. After a couple weeks and a lot of paperwork, we made our way to Iceland. We were able to observe and participate in the first ever multinational live SAR exercise between Arctic countries; this was called Arctic Guardian 2017. Various Arctic nations worked together to recover life boats and personnel if a major catastrophe were to take place in the future. We were able to interact with leaders of other coast guards and even talked with Admiral Z while aboard the Pierre Radisson, the Canadian icebreaker that hosted the damage control drills for all of the nations. It was remarkable, noticing the similarities and differences of our countries.

 

We also had some free time to explore around the city. Did you know that Icelanders have a fascination with hot dogs, also known as pylsurs? I bought a pylsur from Baejarins Beztu Pylsur in Reyjavik, the stand that President Clinton visited. Hands down, that was the most amazing hot dog I have ever eaten; they make their dogs differently and put special toppings on it. It definitely is worth checking out if you’re ever in Iceland. Other than my new obsession with pylsurs, we had the chance to walk around downtown Reykjavík and drive by many beautiful landforms. I even got to see the Northern Lights.

 

I never would have thought that I would get the chance to travel to Iceland and honestly, I have the Academy to thank for that. I have been given an amazing opportunity and cannot wait for many more to come.

 

More about Sarah.

 

Summer 2017: Internship in Alaska

(Academics, Class of 2018, Civil Engineering) Permanent link
Kimura Photo Internships at the Academy are definitely possible and so rewarding. Every major offers summer internships to cadets entering their senior year. These range from working at the NSA, the White House, U.S. Coast Guard bases, NOAA, Army Corps of Engineers, and many others!

 

I spent my summer internship at the Base Kodiak, Alaska working with the facilities engineering (FE) department. I am a civil major, which is a highly needed field in the Coast Guard. At FE, the floor is composed of a CDR, LCDR, LT, an information technician, mechanical technicians, electrical technician, environmental technicians, and various other contracting officer representatives. The five-week experience allowed me to see and contribute to actual Coast Guard projects. For example, the flight decks were being repaved and we regularly inspected the hangars to prioritize upcoming projects. On the other hand, Base Kodiak has a water treatment facility on site, so monitoring the water quality to the houses fell on the environmental department. In addition, there were building projects being planned, such as replacing WWII era houses or remodeling the Child Development Center’s playground.

 

I was always busy doing something, whether it was FE work, shadowing other technicians there, exploring Kodiak Island, or meeting the junior officers (recent Academy graduates) nearby. While at the internship, I stayed at the barracks on base and borrowed my LT’s truck to get around. Firstie summer has by far been my favorite summer training experience because of the independence I was given to drive to work on my own, cook for myself, plan hikes after work or camp on the weekends.

 

More about Amy.

 

Rolling on the River

(Academics, Just for Fun, Class of 2020) Permanent link
Farlow Photo The academic year is rolling along here on the Thames in New London and I could not be more excited to be a third class cadet. It was great to return to the Academy from leave and see my friends and teammates, some of whom I had not seen in over three months. Last time my class walked the halls together we wore green shields on our uniforms and bore no stripe on our shoulder boards. Now we have returned wearing red shields and having earned a single diagonal stripe. This year will bring so many new adventures, new lessons, new friends, and perhaps most importantly the privilege to look at my food again. Third class year is a transition out of followership and into role-modeling. For my class, we will be setting an example for fourth class, holding ourselves accountable, and finishing out our core classes.

 

At the end of fourth class year, cadets are shuffled and moved to new companies where they will remain for the duration of the next three years. I was an Alfa fourth class and was placed in Charlie for the next three. I am interested to learn about Charlie’s role in the corps and what I can do to be a part of it as a third class. I am also eager to help fourth class get through this year because although it is tough, it is worth it, but that can be difficult to see while you’re experiencing it.

 

I am also excited to start taking major-specific classes and really begin to understand the Operations Research major. This semester I am taking two math classes, a computer language class, American Government, Rescue Swimming, Organizational Behavior and Leadership, and Spanish. I am really looking forward to the computer language and math classes. Outside of class I am part of the women’s rugby team this season as well as Cadets Against Sexual Assault, Spectrum Council and Women’s Leadership Council.

 

Go 3/c year and Go Bears!

 

More about Francesca.