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cadet blogs

Parting Words

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2016) Permanent link   All Posts
Daghir Photo So not to be too sad or morbid, but this may be my last Academy blog post. I guess we really should stifle the sniffles and see it for the jubilant occasion that it is: I AM GRADUATING. After 4.5 years of blood, sweat, tears, and hard work, countless friends, marching, and emails, I have to say that I am finally coming to the golden butter bar light at the end of this brick tunnel. I am sad to leave but entirely satisfied with the time and more importantly the relationships and accomplishments I will be packing up and taking with me. One of the first things to go will be the laptop that I am currently typing this blog on: the thing has a 50/50 chance of not deleting whatever document I am procrastinating my way through. But in addition to the struggling electronic systems, parade dress uniform items, and tattered bedding, I will be leaving behind the days of communal bathrooms, classroom naps, team sports, and wardroom food. I have become my own person through this crazy process and I have to say that I am still a work in progress but a lot sturdier than I was when I came in as a freshman, fragile and shiny and breakable emotionally (and physically?) but I have learned how to be mentally tough, and learned how to handle stress and even to lift a little in the gym. This experience was one in a million.

 

I guess I will leave some advice, sort of like what I left for the fourth class when I made it to the esteemed title of third class, but this is more for the second class, or the seniors looking into the kaleidoscope of their upcoming last semester. They all experience a beautiful tunnel vision that keeps all of reality from resembling anything more than brightly colored patterns in the eyes of anxious excited first class. I’ll start with a thank you: to all of my lacrosse teammates, Delta Company, and my Marine and Environmental Sciences people. I will never forget the kindness, motivation, and fun I found in spending the last four.5 years of my life with you in some capacity. I think that it is important to stay well rounded and I felt supported from every angle.

 

Okay, time for some advice:

 

  1. Smile. Don’t ever forget: no matter how rough school, drama, military, family, or friends seem, you can always take a breath, smile, and remember that life is all about perspective. You will have time, and the stuff will get done. Smiling is contagious and it actually will make you and other people feel better :)
  2. Go for it. Take every opportunity. Don’t sit on the sidelines of life. The things that we regret are those that we did not do. Be adventurous and go outside. Appreciate your ability to be in the wild, to be with friends, and with the world. Offer to help people, be adventurous – you never know what you will find.
  3. Connections are key – to next jobs, to finding fun things to do, to meeting new people and learning new things. It is important to network and to have a story about yourself that will capture all who are lucky enough to bump into you. Be unforgettable and don’t forget the people you meet. (As a side note, people really appreciate thank you cards.)
  4. Stay open minded. Remember that you are never going to have full control. Be able to stay on your toes and be adaptable. Change will happen and if you let it ruin your day it will, or it could make you stronger and better at what you do.

 

There is probably more to say but I write too much as it is. Being in the Coast Guard is cool and it teaches you a lot more than how to drive a boat.

 

More about Lucy.