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HALL OF HEROES
WALL OF GALLANTRY - 2014
  • Pritchard Thumb 
  • Stewart Thumb 
  • Denninger Thumb 
  • Andrews Thumb 
  • Ellis Thumb 
  • Pritchard Photo

    John A. Pritchard

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1938

    Navy and Marine Corps Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For heroic conduct while serving aboard the USCGC Northland during the rescue of November 23, 1942, of three members of the Royal Canadian Air Force stranded on the Greenland Ice Cap for thirteen days. Volunteering to lead a rescue party from the ship, Lieutenant Pritchard proceeded with his men by motor launch on the fringe of heavy ice, close aboard the glacier outlet to the bay and, fully aware of the ever present danger of calving Anoretok Glacier, landed on the shore. Accompanied by his men, he daringly worked his way up a mountainside to the glacier and established contact with the marooned airmen by lights and voice. Realizing that speed was imperative, he and his party pressed on, crossing several hundred yards of heavily crevassed area after dark in order to reach the exhausted fliers and finally succeeded in bringing them safely to the ship. Lieutenant Pritchard’s intelligent planning, fearless leadership and great personal valor aided materially in the gallant rescue of the stranded men and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    (Download pdf) 

  • Stewart Photo

    William Hart Stewart

    Rear Admiral
    Class of 1949

    Bronze Star Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious service in connection with operations involving conflict against the enemy forces of North Vietnam, as Commanding Officer, USCGC Androscoggin (WHEC 68). Commander Stewart displayed outstanding professionalism and decisiveness in countering the infiltration attempt of an enemy steel hulled, trawler-type, supply ship off the coast of South Vietnam while on Market Time patrol on the evening of 29 February 1968. After skillfully shadowing the enemy vessel for several hours, Commander Stewart closed and challenged the trawler and upon receiving no reply opened fire with Androscoggin’s main battery, scoring a direct hit. The destruction of the trawler which was loaded with arms and munitions for Viet Cong forces prevented these vitally needed materials from reaching the enemy and was accomplished without serious personnel or material casualty although Androscoggin was taken under fire herself. The quick timely initiative and professional conduct displayed by Commander Stewart was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    (Download pdf) 

  • Denninger Photo

    John G. Denninger, Jr

    Captain
    Class of 1962

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight during the predawn hours of 14 February 1974 as aircraft commander of Coast Guard HH-3F 1481 helicopter engaged in the perilous rescue of four crewmen of the fishing vessel Normar under extremely hazardous conditions in the Shelikof Strait, Gulf of Alaska. The vessel had been trapped by a vicious storm in the Shelikof Strait, grounded in a cove along the mountainous Alaska Peninsula and capsized due to heavy superstructure icing encountered in the hurricane force wind-swept seas. The four-man crew abandoned their vessel and took refuge in a life raft tethered to her stern. Lieutenant Commander Denninger and his crew dispatched from Kodiak Air Station successfully battled 70-knott winds, severe turbulence and near zero visibility due to sea smoke, spray and fog, until they reached the distress scene 180 miles from Kodiak. Carefully coordination instruction from an orbiting C-130 and information from radar, he skillfully maneuvered the helicopter along the jagged coastline into the narrow mountainous cove in which the Normar lay capsized and broken and located the survivors huddled in a raft. Lieutenant Commander Denninger immediately established and maintained an exact hover over the wind-driven raft in the face of the 2,500-foot mountain directly in front of him and steep cliffs on two sides which restricted maneuverability. Although the Normar caught fire during the hoisting operation, further compounding the hazardous flying conditions as smoke and fuel vapors enshrouded the helicopter Lieutenant Commander Denninger, undaunted, maintained his position throughout the 13-minute hover until all survivors had been hoisted to safety. With expert prevision, he then maneuvered the helicopter to escape the confines of the hazardous cove before setting course for Kodiak. Lieutenant Commander Denninger’s expert aeronautical skill and dauntless valor throughout this perilous mission resulted in saving the lives of the men. His heroic courage, sound judgment and unwavering devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Denninger was also awarded a second Distinguished Flying Cross and a Coast Guard Commendation Medal for heroism during his career. Lieutenant Commander Denninger retired with the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Andrews Photo

    David L. Andrews

    Captain
    Class of 1963

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Lieutenant Commander Andrews is cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the night of 13 March 1973 as pilot and aircraft commander of Coast Guard HH-3F 1436 helicopter engaged in the perilous hoist of two crewmen from the sinking fishing vessel Norden. The aircraft had been dispatched from the Air Station San Diego to assist the Norden, which was disabled and adrift in 20-foot seas with winds exceeding 40 knots in a position 25 miles southwest of San Clemente Island, California. As darkness approached and the weather deteriorated, Lieutenant Commander Andrews hoisted one of the two crewmen from the fishing vessel under extremely adverse conditions. A United States Navy Destroyer arrived on scene and attempted to take the Norden in tow. However, during the evolution, the Norden was severely damaged and her master thrown into the turbulent seas. After passing under the Navy vessel, he surfaced on the opposite side of the ship, immobile in the water due to injuries received during immersion. Lieutenant Commander Andrews, realizing the survivor’s plight, quickly assessed the situation and determined that descending into the trough and “scooping” the victim in the rescue basket was the only means of retrieving him from the water. After ten minutes of extremely arduous and demanding flying, the rescue basket was positioned under the victim and he was hoisted aboard the helicopter and taken to a nearby hospital in serious condition. Lieutenant Commander Andrews’ expert aeronautical skill and dauntless valor throughout this perilous rescue mission resulted in saving the lives of the men. His heroic courage, sound judgment and unwavering devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    (Download pdf) 

  • Ellis Photo

    James B. Ellis, II

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1966

    Bronze Star Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious service while service with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong communist aggressors in the Republic of Vietnam from September 1968 to June 1970. While serving as Commanding Officer of the United States Coast Guard Cutter Point Orient, Lieutenant Ellis performed Market Time patrols in the South China Sea. His aggressive leadership, initiative and sound judgment made his vessel a highly effective combat unit. During those patrols, he boarded and searched numerous sampans and apprehended over three hundred Viet Cong suspects. He aggressively pursued and inflicted the enemy with heavy losses during 80 naval gunfire support missions, which resulted in seven bunkers, 86 structure and 159 sampans destroyed. After being transferred to the staff of Coast Guard Division Twelve, he was instrumental in planning and scheduling for Vietnamization of the division’s assets. On 16 March 1970, when the division was decommissioned, he became an advisor to the Vietnamese Navy. Lieutenant Ellis’ exemplary professionalism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    (Download pdf)